top little ghost
top kissmyass
top junge, komm bald wieder
top From hand to hand
top Meoto Iwa

Meoto Iwa, or the Loved one-and-loved one Rocks, are a couple of small rocky stacks in the sea off Futami, Mie, Japan. They are joined by a shimenawa (a heavy rope of rice straw) and are considered sacred by worshippers at the neighbouring Futami Okitama Shrine (Futami Okitama Jinja. According to Shinto, the rocks represent the union of the creator of kami, Izanagi and Izanami. The rocks, therefore, celebrate the union in marriage of man and woman. The rope, which weighs over a ton, must be replaced several times a year in a special ceremony. The larger rock, said to be male, has a small torii at its peak. (Wikipedia)

Private collection

top Exploring the nearby hills with a dose of imagination; learning
top Exploring the nearby hills with a dose of imagination; learning
top Exploring the nearby hills with a dose of imagination; learning
top Bathroom Mirror

In The Dollhouse, 2012 plays out in a 10 part sequential narrative, photographed in a custom built adult sized dollhouse. This time Dina takes on one of the most powerful symbols of Western culture: Barbie and Ken, the beloved and idealized American couple. More than any other childhood construct, Barbie represents the concept that `Beauty´ is the apex trait and is necessary to attain power and happiness. Her co-star Ken, who has been trapped in an imposed marriage for over three decades, discovers his authentic self and finally expresses his individuality. Barbie´s fate is grim in Goldstein´s hands, as she breaks down and confronts her own value and fleeting relevance.

top Sleeping Beauty

, Fallen Princesses series was born in 2007 out of deep personal pain, when she raged against the “happily ever after” motif we are spoon fed since childhood. The series creates metaphor out of the myths of fairy tales, forcing the viewer to contemplate real life: failed dreams, addiction, obesity, Cancer, the extinction of indigenous culture, pollution, war and the fallacy of chasing eternal youth. By embracing the textures and colors created by Walt Disney, which built a multi-billion dollar empire exploiting these fairy tales, Fallen Princesses exposes the consumerism that has negated the morality of these ancient parables. It also begs the question, "How do we define the concept of ‘good’? and how do we live a ‘good’ life?”